While Clinton may want to expand her ground game to win over the voters who didn't vote in the 2008 Iowa caucus, an analysis by the Huffington Post's Sam Stein argues that there isn't any evidence of a substantial jump in turnout.

(4) On November 29, CNN published an editorial that argued, “What’s ahead is a real choice between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. If she wins, it will be Hillary Clinton for her entire career – not Obama’s.” (5) In response, Sanders said:

While Clinton and Obama both have their strengths, she is the more qualified candidate because she has more experience in the fight against poverty, and I think people are going to be saying, ‘I just went to a meeting with her, and there were some things they are going to need to do by the end of this month…She is the more qualified candidate – that is going to be the position of people during the course of the primaries.’ I can think of a number of reasons why that won’t be the case, but that will depend on how the Republican candidates perform nationally.”

On December 1, NBC’s Brian Williams reported from Des Moines that “Clinton’s camp appears to be backing off a planned rally in New Hampshire…The Clinton camp wants the Iowa campaign to go all out in 2016 and they’re hoping the Clinton team’s own network of volunteers will be enough to make it all happen.” (6) The following day, a Politico article cited Clinton’s campaign strategist Joel Benenson as saying, “Our campaign sees a very strong potential for expanding that work going forward. We feel confident that we’ll have a good ground game for her in Iowa and I think that will be very important.” While Clinton may want to expand her ground game to win over the voters who didn’t vote in the 2008 Iowa caucus, an analysis by the Huffington Post’s Sam Stein argues that there isn’t any evidence of a substantial jump in turnout. (7) Sanders has been critical of the media coverage surrounding the candidates and the media, suggesting it “represents the Republican party and not the American working class.” On a December 3, 2015 edition of “The Rachel Maddow Show”, Sanders said, “The media is a key part of the story of the Republican Party but I don’t think that they’re going to play up Republican candidates’ strengths and not campaign on the fact that they have the worst record on minimum wage, for minimum wage workers, the need for a $15 an hour minimum. …We are going to start mobilizing millions of people in this country to organize. Nobody should underestimate us on that.”

A day after that interview, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough introduced Sanders’ campaign manager Jeff Weaver as “The Sanders campaign’s political intelligence officer who’s been working for him, on behalf of him to make sure that Sanders is ready for the fall and the general election.” (8)

  • Clinton has been critical of Sanders, saying he should be “shaming” himself, calling him “a long-shot candidate, a long shot with the wind blowing his way today.” Clinton said on October 28, 2015, the day of the Vermont senator’s third debate of the Iowa 2016 Democratic primary (9), that Sanders “gives the Clinton campaign one of their best challenges. He’s been very successful in appealing not just politically, but he can win in Iowa, which is crucial to the Democrats nationwide, and I think that will be a real test. . . . He is a long shot and we have not been leading anywhere near the polls, I think he’s a long shot and the Democrats will be debating who is more realistic and who is not.” The day after the third debate, Clinton said on ABC’s This Week that Sanders’ plan to expand Social Security benefits “doesn’t make any sense” because it has already been passed: “By the way, I would just say to Senator Sanders, we’ve already gone through that process. It has passed, it’s very well known in Congress. And why doesn’t he take the issue on with the folks in favor of Social Security, the same way that Paul Ryan has taken it on.” (10)

  • Clinton also said on October 28, 2015, the day of the Vermont senator’s third debate of the Iowa 2016 Democratic primary, that she believed her opponent “got a little jolted up last night when he responded to me when I brought up Social Security, when he said, you have to stop.” Sanders said on October 28, 2015, the day of the Vermont senator’s third debate of the Iowa 2016 Democratic primary, that Clinton was “the candidate of Wall Street and corporate America.”

  • By the end of 2015, when CNN reported that Sanders would make an “announcement to supporters,” the campaign was no longer calling out Clinton and she was no longer calling out Sanders. In response to this change, Bloomberg’s Mark Halperin reported that Hillary Clinton’s “spokespeople have not responded…to a request for comment.” * On November 15, 2015 CNN published an editorial that argued, “No one is seriously saying Clinton will win in Iowa, but it’s not a given that she’ll loseshe has an important structural advantage over Sanders and Republicans

Meanwhile I've just come back from a trip down to Mexico, meeting with the Fed, and the Mexican stock market is up 8.7 since the beginning of the year, and they are holding a massive rally, which makes me think they have got the economy moving in the wrong direction. The conversation continued, with Baskin, speaking of his experience on the series, and Goonies creator Mike Reiss mentioning that the director is on, but that it hasn't caught the film yet.
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