A judge began the process by getting about five, maybe six, people on both sides to submit written affidavits from both citizens who know the man who is not named in the press and the arrest warrant.

A judge began the process by getting about five, maybe six, people on both sides to submit written affidavits from both citizens who know the man (who is not named in the press and the arrest warrant).

The judge asked each of the people to write down whether they would volunteer to act as jurors and explain why they think the man should not be convicted.

It was pretty evident that those three who testified were very well-meaning people with strong opinions on the case. And it appears that their arguments were not very persuasive. But in the end, the trial judge did tell the jury that he would not be ruling on whether the man should be convicted until sometime in March. So on Tuesday they are going to have to decide whether his sentence is enough.

For the next few days, the court will be hearing testimony from many people who have personal knowledge of the incident. The most powerful character witnesses are going to be Steve Goss, a bartender who happened to be working in the same bar as the victim (and who works as a private detective for the Rochester Police Department) and Bill Foltz, a former Rochester firefighter and the owner and operator of the bar where the incident took place. It will also be exciting to hear one of the witnesses testify.

After the witnesses testify, the judge will hear from the prosecutor about what he wishes the jury do. Of course there are many possibilities in the case, but prosecutors and defense lawyers are bound to try to win some points or perhaps be able to negotiate a plea agreement and a punishment for the alleged killer. A decision is expected to be made in about a week.

For more information about the trial, click here . The trial begins at about 1000 on Wednesday afternoon and it will continue until Tuesday afternoon when the verdict is expected.

As a new public health agency, I want to make sure that money is put into places that have the capacity for providing those important services, Wright says. httpwww.ncbi.nlm.nih.govpubmed22796793 However, it is not at all clear if Blue Bubble intentionally filters out the lowerlevel but potentially harmful compounds from its eliquid, or if ecigarette companies do so due to FDA regulations that dictate that manufacturers must remove all of the toxic chemicals from eliquid by June 1, 2015.
Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×