The country has opened no public health centres since October, the first month in which it was known that the deadly virus had infected seven people, and not until June 18 did the government make an Ebola policy statement, according to the official China Daily .

One recent news report is this Chinese Ebola outbreak - is it over? - by Chinese state media.

China: The Latest In China, Ebola Stacks Up In The Landscape

As The Register’s Alison Jackson reported in July , China has already begun a public health emergency in the east and central Chinese provinces of Jiangsu, Gansu, Henan and Zhejiang, as well as a “hot zone” for the virus in Fujian province. In Guangdong, the capital, health authorities have opened three Ebola treatment centres. Zimbabwe is also considering banning flights from that country.

The government has tried to contain Ebola by limiting travel to affected areas. But there is also growing concern that the country is not handling the Ebola emergency well enough. The country has opened no public health centres since October, the first month in which it was known that the deadly virus had infected seven people, and not until June 18 did the government make an Ebola policy statement, according to the official China Daily . The newspaper noted that there is “little fear” of further infections, but China’s health care system is not up to the task. It continues to struggle to establish hospitals and public health centres as the outbreak has grown, and is grappling with the country’s heavy debt.

Beijing seems to be working to establish its own screening programmes. A new system may be put into place. What is required is a system to identify and prevent travelers who may have travelled to a region showing increased Ebola risks, and those who enter an area where any such risk has increased, The New York Times reports. There have already been a number of cases of suspected Ebola in China. Those who have travelled to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone cannot be admitted to hospital because there is no specific screening required, the newspaper reports .

One reason behind this situation is a huge disparity in the number of cases seen in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, which make up one-quarter, one-third and 10 per cent of the country respectively on average, per the WHO. That means that more than 100 people on average travel to these countries without being screened. Health authorities have made suggestions to reduce the travel risk to other countries, but as far as China is concerned, nothing has become of it, and so the Chinese population keeps getting sicker. The BBC reports : There is growing awareness of the danger after reports of cases in recent weeks, though efforts to prevent them have been inadequate. It has helped fuel the fears. Last week, the head of China’s World Health Organization urged public health authorities to intensify surveillance for the virus in the four major countries with Ebola outbreaks, saying the number of people with Ebola had reached five. Last week, experts also warned of a “greater” risk of the virus spreading to China .

The BBC also notes that the “global response appears to be faltering” in many countries affected by Ebola, and while the official number of cases is falling, the number of deaths appears to be increasing.

One other solution, as my colleague Jodie Burdett has pointed out many times, is to eliminate old and infested furniture and carpets from the subway New York State mandates that tenants be told if their apartment has worn down from sitting open. Unfortunately, we have received the information that at least five Japanese nationals who are in China may have died as a result of the storm, said the ministry's director general of communications, Hiroshi Ishii.
Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×