Last month, the Wall Street Journal reported Several countries, including China and Russia, are also expanding internet controls to block 'illegal content,' even as activists and politicians around the world continue to demand web services take responsibility for the actions of their users.

_ This is not the first recent case of an online community going online to share the pain of a sick family member – the first in China was published in 2009.

Last year, in this article from the WSJ’s Asian Affairs section, I explained how communities of “cybertrolls” have gone online and spread lies and misinformation about the families of real victims of the 9/11 attacks. And in this article from The China Daily, which in 2014 became the most popular news outlet in China because it reported the real stories of victims, I wrote how these cyop trolls tried to destroy people’s lives, falsely telling people that their dead relatives owned slaves, killed other people, or were homosexuals. _ This is not the first recent case of an online community going online to share the pain of a sick family member – the first in China was published in 2009. China’s Internet censors had blocked Weibo, China’s Twitter, on Saturday, but in practice, it didn’t really matter because the official Chinese version of Weibo also had blocked it, reports Reuters, which also reports on the official version of Weibo. The people behind the blackout were trying to stop discussion of the 9/11 families and the attacks themselves, but couldn’t stop discussion of the real events. It’s not clear when the censors restored normal access, but it was only a short time before Chinese social media exploded with all manner of fake accounts and propaganda. And as Reuters notes: If the censors don’t come to their senses now (the next time they manage to take down some other large websites), then they’ll have set off a global wave of cyber-bullying that will send many Chinese internet users fleeing from their web-based media.

Last month, the Wall Street Journal reported: “Several countries, including China and Russia, are also expanding internet controls to block ‘illegal content,’ even as activists and politicians around the world continue to demand web services take responsibility for the actions of their users.” In other words, they will have been too busy harassing people on the internet to listen very carefully to what people have been saying. And that means another problem that is being created by China’s censorship of the internet. _ This is not the first recent case of an internet community going online to share the pain of a sick family member – the first in China was published in 2009. China’s Internet censors had blocked Weibo, China’s Twitter, on Saturday, but in practice, it didn’t really matter because the official Chinese version of Weibo also had blocked it, reports Reuters, which also reports on the official version of Weibo. The people behind the blackout were trying to stop discussion of the 9/11 families and the attacks themselves, but couldn’t stop discussion of the real events. It’s not clear when the censors restored normal access, but it was only a short time before Chinese social media exploded with all manner of fake accounts and propaganda. And as Reuters notes: If the censors don’t come to their senses now (the next time they manage to take down some other large websites), then they’ll have set off a global wave of cyber-bullying that will send many Chinese internet users fleeing from their web-based media. And as Reuters notes: China is in many ways an outlier in the internet world. Unlike the United States and China, the internet in China is controlled by government-directed private companies , while the vast majority is run by privately owned platforms that are open to anyone who wants to use them. That explains why China’s internet is so much more censored than the U.S.’s is – because, whereas the U.S. is controlled by companies, the vast majority of China’s internet is free. Just how much of the western internet we see is censored remains a mystery to me at least: “This is partly because China’s government is more secretive about where the Chinese internet goes than the U.S. or even Russia,” said Kevin Gentry, research director and director of the free speech program at the Chinese Internet Information Office . (The Chinese government claims it controls 90 percent of China’s internet bandwidth, compared with some figures of 75-85 percent for the U.S.) “As with a lot of things related to censorship,” Gentry added, “there’s a lot of misinformation being spread, and that’s where we see the impact in the China story.”

We can look around the world and tell very similar stories of how this internet censorship is affecting us and how to stop it. Take the case of Japan. After a suicide bombing occurred on August 12, 2011, the authorities in Tokyo started asking around for help identifying the identities of the bomber. Eventually, they found an account on a Japanese Twitter account named @id. The account was about to get hacked, but the official Japanese Twitter account took the matter into their own hands and issued a tweet:

The “id” was identified as Naoki Urasawa, 28 years old. He had a record of being convicted

A team of researchers who work with families on housing issues, including those with a background in epidemiology, will conduct testing to determine whether the presence of the virus in the community is part of the reason for the infection. At the moment the drug itself is given in doses that the human body doesn't normally react too much to but when the treatment is given once a month the rate of the disease decline has been shown to be slowed down by at least 15 per cent.
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