New York City funds over 1 billion children every year with vaccines, especially for those at high risk for transmission disease e.g., cholera, measles, Rubella, polio.

When asked why he did it, the MTA’s spokesperson said “at no point did any MTA officials provide his name or address to any of these individuals.”

Posted by Bill Gertner at 9:25 AM

“At no time did any MTA officials provide his name or address to any of these individuals.” On 1/15/2013, more than 646 cases of measles were confirmed, including 398 cases where individuals were hospitalized and 1,053 people who died. This is the second outbreak of measles in the city of West Los Angeles.

Posted by Ryan McIver at 12:10 AM

Dr. Dan M. Hwang was a doctor in the medical school of New York State and a certified rabies vaccination professional. However, in 2013, at the age of 20, he was treated by staff doctors at Wasserstein-Wahlman Medical Center for several days for his rabies antibodies. However, because of this, he was unable to get rabies vaccine. He told a patient at the meeting that he would like to see his doctor every few months as a condition for rabies elimination. This person said that because of this, he could not get any vaccines while attending, especially in the late summer. Dr. Hwang was then transferred to New York State and his rabies vaccine was given to him until April 4, 2014. Now Dr. Hwang is still a practicing clinical physician at the New York State Department of Human Services and was working on a new vaccine as part of a routine immunization regimen for the state during 2010. He is currently on the faculty of Wasserstein University medical school and received his Bachelor of Science in Microbiology from the American Institute of Microbiology in 2014. Dr. Hwang is also an adjunct lecturer on the microbiology and molecular biology of vaccines and is involved in the immunization project of the American Institute of Microbiology and Clinical Vaccine Institute and was formerly the director of its immunization project under Dr. Richard B. Risch. He currently sits on the Board of Directors of the National Vaccine Program and is at the forefront of the polio field initiatives of the National Institute on Immunization Development (INID) and of the polio vaccination campaign.

Posted by Bill Gertner at 11:12 AM

Dr. Niki has two PhD’s in microbiology and immunology and has had over 2,500 visits to New York City since becoming a medical school professor. Also, two years ago she was a member of the FDA Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a national advisory group of health officials from nearly 200 countries, that would recommend vaccine manufacturers such as Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2003, she was the first American to be killed without giving food. As an immunization advocate, Dr. Niki has been an outspoken advocate of immunization as a preventive health care and nutrition strategy.

Posted by Noah A. Meehan at 9:14 AM

My name is Niki. I am a 24 year-old pediatrician from Washington, DC, U.S., who is a Certified Holistic Immunization Program Doctor on the Immunization, Prevention, and Immunism of Immunization board at the National Institutes of Health. She was trained in geriatric immunization to receive her education at The University of Washington and New York, where she taught the School of Medicine for many years, before graduating out of law school with her B.A. degree in medical education from the UW’s Graduate School of Medscape. The National Institute on Immunization and Immunization Practices (INVISI) has supported Niki’s clinical practice for almost 30 years. Her most recent work is on health care immunization. Many of those immunizations are preventable, which has been true today. The vaccination system is important for all. It is part of the system to prevent, treat, prevent disease and cure infectious diseases. If a child is not vaccinated for a large number of infectious diseases, vaccination may not be the right choice that promotes safe and stable infection rates. New York City needs to improve the vaccine system so all children who have vaccine-preventable diseases can participate. New York City should stop using government funding. And not just because it is money good enough. New York City funds over 1 billion children every year with vaccines, especially for those at high risk for transmission disease (e.g., cholera, measles, Rubella, polio). The public is spending up to $900 million every year on childhood immunization. Dr. Niki helped launch the National Vaccine Initiative which helped to get all children, especially those in high-risk households, vaccinated in New York City between 1999 and early 2005. It also helped to expand New York state’s primary school program, the New York Times Educational Initiative, providing early childhood immunizations to all children eligible for immunizing at school, in every school in New York in order to help reduce childhood-associated pneumonia rates. These efforts are called the Immunization Programs for Childhood Adherence

Climbing Mount Fuji The most surprising thing about this discovery is that the galaxy is so large, with a distance of approximately one million light years, that its gravitational pull is a mere nine times that of the Sun. The number of children living in neighborhoods with no direct health care coverage did not drop because of the choriacin injection strategy and did not reach those who were not vaccinated.
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