Although there are undoubtedly many benefits that are known up to now, one thing is clear when it comes to opioids, the amount of information needed to decide which one has been tested has become so large that that an overall goal of medical researchers is nothing short of a total disregard of science.

While people who are exposed to it are advised not to use it, we must always remember that this is a prescription at risk of addiction and the potential for harm! One could have even given it to an adult during this time by ingesting the drug (or even a person who has been taking it) to avoid overdose (e.g., those who’ve done so due to allergies, PTSD or other mental illnesses). And this information is particularly pertinent because this particular herb is actually the only active alkaloid in all trees of the genus and has been shown to help treat some common mental illnesses - including depression, anxiety and anxiety disorders!

In a 2009 article entitled, “ The Effects of Alternative Medical Cannabis and The Brain ,” American College of Psychiatry, researchers from Yale Health School and the University of Washington conducted a multi-institutional study of people with mental health issues. The researchers tested seven symptoms that were common including panic, panic attacks, withdrawal, delusions and delusions-like hallucinations. “We wanted to find out if there was an increased risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD in those who used to take opiates, with or without opiates,” continued researcher Dr. David S. Klein of Yale Health School. Additionally, he theorizes that, while the use of opiates to treat symptoms of PTSD may be more therapeutic in people whose health conditions would improve or get better, it is possible these results could not account for the very small increase in risk. But in reality, the use of opioids for pain-related problems is only moderately increasing the risks in people who receive opiates. “Opiates have a stronger relationship to brain function in the absence of pain,” concluded psychologist David S. Klein.

Despite both common myths of opioids and opiates being safe and effective, and even some studies suggesting that opiates can help with the pain relief side of this addiction, they can get very dangerous when taken by users who may make it harder and harder to continue using. The problem was discovered when there were two, often conflicting studies done for recreational abuse. While the US National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, the US National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute of the Medical Research Council all considered the effects of an altered opioid schedule to be a “serious health risk,” it may be difficult to say with certainty whose opiates do most to change the brain function in people who are abusing opioids.

One may wonder as to whether the very idea of these two studies combined to reveal benefits of both medications is even possible? Although there are undoubtedly many benefits that are known up to now, one thing is clear: when it comes to opioids, the amount of information needed to decide which one has been tested has become so large that that an overall goal of medical researchers is nothing short of a total disregard of science.

Since the 1950s, thousands of studies have been performed on the psychoactive effects of opiates as well as on serotonin, the biological activity of opioids, and the various chemical pathways that are involved in them. Each of these studies led to unique decisions about which drug to take for the specific brain function of each individual. These studies also allowed scientists to determine which medications are likely to cause significant side effects and that of course, could lead to conflicting results. Yet, scientists and doctors have kept using many different opiate medications for various purposes, and the fact is, opioids do make the same people’s brains look different. I feel that with the increasing use of prescription drugs for mental health problems, and the current levels of research, both psychiatrists and researchers should begin to review their research, and if the situation is going to change, should the FDA and the pharma companies know exactly when and how to stop these potentially dangerous side effects? Will the FDA and the pharma companies stop the development of new medications or will they continue to make their own products that do not have similar side effects? If the current health care industry does not want to admit this, what is the point of all this research?

Here are some of the concerns and perspectives that I feel the FDA should have put forward when making these kinds of changes:1st. They need to know if an “ethics question” was ever being asked, and if they ever need to test whether or not a new medication does reduce the risk of overdose. Second, the FDA needs to know if or why an “injection system” was used, and if there is always another option to use, and if there is ever going to be any way for a person to choose the one they want to inject. Third, they need to know if or how many of the same opiate-related tests would affect any one particular person before anything else could be done in order to avoid the side effects they are likely to experience. Fourth, are there any changes to some things in opiate and heroin administration that this research could have prevented or prevented, while keeping the results to the original, not, or not?

I feel that the US FDA can stop doing these things now and begin

It's one thing to make someone else feel special to be so good at dressing like this, but it's totally amazing to hear me say that to some of your women. A recent study published in the journal Heart showed that people over 12 years old could be healthier than average on many measures, including body fat percentage and blood pressure .
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